Pigeon plague is a 'health hazard' for Newmarket residents

Regent Court resident Anne Dunn, above, says she has repeatedly complained to building owners Flagship Housing about the damage the pigeons
Regent Court resident Anne Dunn, above, says she has repeatedly complained to building owners Flagship Housing about the damage the pigeons
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Residents in Newmarket’s Regent Court say they are living next to a ‘health hazard’ as pigeons are leaving their communal garden and entrance a mess.

The birds have been nesting under the sheltered accommodation’s solar panels after they pulled away wire mesh which had previously prevented them hiding under the panels.
Resident Anne Dunn said: “The pigeons are leaving bird poo everywhere, covering the outside walls, windows and furniture.

PIGEON PLAGUE: The birds are nesting under Regent Court's solar panels

PIGEON PLAGUE: The birds are nesting under Regent Court's solar panels

“It looks disgusting. We have a really nice garden and patio and it’s being ruined.”

Mrs Dunn, who has lived in the complex for almost six years, added: “This has been going on for years. It’s gradually getting worse.”

She said it had become an environmental health risk, and was concerned about residents living there with respiratory health issues.

Mrs Dunn said that last year she had cleaned up the mess, but was refusing to continue because she believed it was the responsibility of Flagship Homes which manages the housing complex in Rowley Drive.

“I know it costs money,” said Mrs Dunn, “but the end of the day we pay our rent and this is our home”.

She said that Flagship and environmental health officials knew about the issue, having taken photographs of the damage caused by the pigeons.

Liam Betts, managing director of Flagship Housing’s maintenance firm RFT Services, told the Journal: “We have responded to previous concerns and made repairs to the wire mesh in place.

“After reviewing the building again this week, we have instructed a company to clean the mess caused by the birds and put a permanent solution in place to prevent them from nesting under the solar panels.

“They will be doing this work at the beginning of February.”