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Suffolk's county councillors to get £26,666 to fund minor highways projects in budget upgrade


By Jason Noble, Local Democracy Reporter


Highways locality budgets are typically used for small scale projects such as zebra crossings, and 20mph zones outside schools, with the new rules making it quicker for projects to get underway
Highways locality budgets are typically used for small scale projects such as zebra crossings, and 20mph zones outside schools, with the new rules making it quicker for projects to get underway

Plans to make minor highways projects like 20mph zones, pedestrian crossings and double yellow lines easier to carry out have been given approval.

Suffolk's county councillors will now get a £26,666 pot at the start of their four year term to use on highways schemes in their community, rather than the annual allocation of £6,666.

The highways locality budgets are typically used for small scale projects such as zebra crossings, and 20mph zones outside schools, with the new rules making it quicker for projects to get underway.

They were unanimously approved at Tuesday’s cabinet meeting, and will come into effect following the next election in 2021.

Conservative cabinet member for highways, Mary Evans, said: “At the heart of the work has been a desire to reform the system to create a fair, transparent mechanism for councillors to be able to promote transport and road safety improvements in their areas.

“For all of us some of the really exciting proposals are here.

“The budgets will be allocated in a lump sum at the start of the term. This will enable us to have some quite bold plans.

“For me, the fundamental point of a local highways budget is it’s local. It’s for the local councillor to determine how it’s spent on projects in his or her own division to support their local community.”

Mrs Evans said it would give councillor’s greater flexibility to make schemes happen that would need more than one year’s budget, and deliver them quicker.

It came after a cross-party task force studied how the budgets worked and ways to improve them.

Labour’s Peter Gardiner, who was a member of the task force, said: “We are supportive of the principal. The one issue is I hope the costs of schemes will come down by the very nature of what we are trying to do.

“Some of the early problems were that the costs of schemes were just too prohibitive.”

As well as using their own budgets, councillors can still pool their pots or seek additional funding elsewhere such as developer contributions from new housing developments and district cash.

As well as improving the scope of projects possible, it will also put a stop to councillors inheriting deficits or leftover funds, Mrs Evans said.



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