USAF airmen from Mildenhall get Rougham’s WW2 flight trainer working

USAF Tech Sgt. Javier Mejia, left, 100th Air Refueling Wing readiness inspector, and Tech. Sgt. Victor Reyes, right, 352nd Special Operations Maintenance Group quality assurance chief inspector, trouble shoot a World War II flight simulator whiles Reyes' son sits inside July 17, 2016, at the Rougham Tower Museum 
(USAF/ Staff Sgt. Micaiah Anthony) ANL-160727-123534001

USAF Tech Sgt. Javier Mejia, left, 100th Air Refueling Wing readiness inspector, and Tech. Sgt. Victor Reyes, right, 352nd Special Operations Maintenance Group quality assurance chief inspector, trouble shoot a World War II flight simulator whiles Reyes' son sits inside July 17, 2016, at the Rougham Tower Museum (USAF/ Staff Sgt. Micaiah Anthony) ANL-160727-123534001

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An early flight simulator used to train World War Two pilots is working again thanks to USAF technicians from RAF Mildenhall.

Called a linked trainer, the mechanical device preserved at Rougham Tower Museum has not worked for years until a group of volunteers from RAF Mildenhall visited the museum in the control tower of the former USAF bomber base intending to do general landscape and cleaning work.

But when the group’s leader, Tech Sgt Javier Mejia, the 100th Air Refueling Wing’s readiness inspector, heard about the trainer, he and Tech Sgt Victor Reyes, 352nd Special Operations Maintenance Group quality assurance chief inspector, decided to take a look.

Sgt Mejia said: “The simulator hadn’t worked for years. We found that it was an electronic problem so we fixed it.”

Michael Brundle, a Rougham Tower Museum guide, said: “During tours, I used to tell visitors that the simulator doesn’t work. I’d tell them ‘this is what a linked trainer looks like’. We didn’t even ask them to fix the flight simulator and before I knew it they got it fixed.

“They did an awful lot of manual work here today. They cleared weeds out of the old tarmac and edged up the grass along the sidewalks. It’s great to see Airmen back on the grounds.”

Tech Sgt David West, of 100th Civil Engineer Squadron, said: “The sacrifices made by all of the Airmen in WW2 are unimaginable, It’s really humbling to be able to come out here and help.”