DCSIMG

Village’s school needs to improve

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A village primary school has been told by Government inspectors that it must improve.

Isleham’s Church of England Primary School was inspected by Ofsted at the end of November and lead inspector Glynis Bradley-Peat said it required improvement in three out of four categories examined, pupils’ achievement, quality of teaching and the school’s leadership and management.

The behaviour and safety of the school’s 207 pupils was said to be good.

Mrs Bradley-Peat said that in order to achieve a good rating in the other categories there were a number of issues the school needed to address. She said pupils’ rates of progress were not “consistently good” across different year groups and subjects and boys did not always make as much progress as girls.

“Teaching does not always motivate the boys who want to learn and they sometimes show a lack of interest in their work ,” said the report.

It added: “The most able pupils do not always make the progress and reach the levels of attainment of which they are capable.”

Pupils’ behaviour was praised by the inspector who said they displayed good attitudes to learning and were proud of their school.

“They get on well with each other and their teachers and always try hard to please them.

“Pupils help each other willingly in lessons and enjoy working together in pairs and groups showing interest and enthusiasm. They develop independence and grow in confidence as they progress through the school.

Teaching was said to be better in Key Stage 2 than in Key Stage 1 and the mathematics curriculum did not focus enough on developing pupils’ thinking and reasoning skills or their ability to calculate efficiently.

The inspector said the headteacher, Nicola Bramley, and the school’s governing body were “fully committed” to bringing about more rapid improvements in the quality of teaching and pupils’ achievements .

“The headteacher leads by example and models her expectations effectively. Staff morale is very high.

“Leaders have a clear understanding of where the school currently is on its journey towards becoming good,” said the report.

She added: “There are examples of outstanding teaching in the school but this is not yet shared effectively enough among all the staff.

“The school improvement plan identifies the right priorities and outlines many useful strategies for improvement.”

 

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