DCSIMG

Crimes recorded in Suffolk fall by 7%

Crimes recorded in Suffolk have fallen by more than seven per cent over the past 12 months.

According to figures released by Suffolk Police, the total number of crimes recorded between April 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014, have dropped by 2,793 from 39,234, the figure recorded over the same time period in 2012 and 2013, to 36,441.

The figures also revealed that detection rates have risen up to 35.1 per cent, an increase of 2.4 per cent on the previous year.

In a break down of the individual figures domestic burglary cases recorded was the biggest faller dropping down by 24 per cent with 453 crimes recorded.

“Our performance this year reflects an organisation which is dedicated and determined to make Suffolk safe,” said Douglas Paxton, chief constable.

“Crime is down and our solved rate is up reflecting a real team effort by officers and staff across the force.

“We are committed to providing the best possible service to our communities to keep people safe while tackling the crime issues that concern them the most.”

Equally pleased with the recent figures was the county’s police and crime commissioner Tim Passmore.

“I am delighted to see that overall recorded crime has fallen in the county over the past year,” said Mr Passmore.

“These latest figures are very encouraging and are an excellent reflection on the dedication of the Constabulary officer’s and staff.”

At the same time it was also announced that performance in other areas within Suffolk Constabulary, such as speed of attendance at emergency incidents and victim satisfaction, had also improved.

“It is important to remember that crime statistics don’t give the full picture of a local policing service,” said Mr Paxton.

“Just as important is the quality of service we offer local people, particularly when becoming victims of crime.

“ Our figures show that victim satisfaction has increased and we are attending over 90 per cent of emergency incidents which is an improvement on last year.”

 

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